Marilyn Gardner Milton

Education

About Marilyn Gardner Milton

Marilyn Gardner Milton’s career in education began when she entered college. Her first steps towards this career choice were accomplished when she graduated from the University of Connecticut with her Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Education. After finishing her time at UConn, she continued her education by splitting her Masters of Education (M.Ed) between Boston State College and Framingham State University, both based in and around the Boston, Massachusetts area. In 1987 Marilyn finished the journey to earn her Ph.D. She graduated from Boston College with her Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Supervision as well as a minor in Computer Science. While both degrees would be of great use in her future, Marilyn wasn’t quite done yet. She finished her education by getting her Juris Doctorate (J.D.) from Suffolk University Law school, where she was also awarded the American Jurisprudence Award for Excellence: Commercial Law.

In 1985 Marilyn Gardner Milton made her first foray into the world of distance learning administration, as well as the first of her roles consulting. She became the Executive Consultant for The Center for Educational Leadership and Technology and held that position until 1995. In 1994 Marilyn became the Executive Director and the Director of Education at the Boston, Massachusetts based Computer Museum, a position she held until 1997. In 2006 she became Director of Business Development for the United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA), a position she holds to this day.

In 1997 Marilyn began her career in the administration of higher education institutes. She was appointed to be the Vice-President of Academic Affairs for the Massachusetts Communications College and the New England Institute of Art. In 2001 she became the Vice-President of Academic Affairs for Bay State College and in 2006 she became a Program Professor and Education Enterprise Associate for Nova Southeastern University, one of the largest non-profit accredited universities in the country. A position she holds to this day.

Should You Attend A Community College or a University?

Should You Attend A Community College or a University?

The choice between attending a community college or a university depends on many factors, such as your plan for higher education and the requirements for admission.

Despite the advantages of community colleges, many students still prefer to attend 4-year universities. They offer a variety of facilities and a more rounded student life. Community colleges usually have 2-year programs that allow students to transfer their associate’s degree to a full university.

Both types of higher education institutions are valid, how do you pick the right one for you? Here are some of the differences between community colleges and universities to help you decide.

Degree Programs

While a community college’s degree programs typically take two years to complete, most four-year universities require students to take general education courses for their first two years.

Some students may choose to take the two years of general education at a community college instead of going to a traditional university. Doing so saves them from having to take many of the same courses in the first year. This can also allow you to save money, as community college courses can often be less expensive.

Student Life

Although community colleges are usually cheaper than universities, they do not have the same level of resources as their four-year counterparts. This means that many students do not have the opportunity to participate in the typical college experience of living on campus or participating in campus life.

If you’re choosing to do 2 years at a community college in order to complete your general education requirements, you may struggle to adapt to university life due to not having entered the university at the same time as your peers. 

Class Size

Most community colleges have small class sizes, which allows for more interaction in the classroom. However, many of their faculty members are employed part-time, which makes it hard for students to have access to their professors. With bigger universities, it can often be the opposite. Your professor may be full-time, but you’re often in bigger classrooms that can range between 40 to 100 students at times. This can lead to a less personalized experience and even the possibility that your professor won’t even know who you are off the top of their head.

Flexibility

Compared to traditional universities, community colleges have a much more diverse student body. They typically have a student body that ranges from 17 to 60 years old, and the average age is around 30. Due to the varying types of students, community colleges are often much more flexible when it comes to your situation. Community colleges often offer more night classes or are more understanding if you have a job or a child at home that affects your attendance.

How does Education Affect Poverty?

How does Education Affect Poverty?

A poor family is a family that has little or no access to basic resources. When one is born into a family that is deprived of basic amenities that include, education, they enter into the cycle of poverty that can affect several other forthcoming generations. This lack of resources and opportunities to improve their livelihoods leaves them in a trap known as poverty. The World Vision California has defined the poverty cycle as an occurrence where at least three generations of a family are poverty-stricken. This explains why there are so many NGOs and charity organizations that advocate for education rights to break the cycle of poverty.

Education is important as it helps to equalize people by impacting them with necessary skills for survival and opens doors to opportunities for thriving that, otherwise, would have been unavailable. High-quality education is recognized internationally as one of the solutions to reducing poverty and improving individuals’ welfare.

Effect of Education on Poverty

 Increased Future Employment Opportunities

A quality education system equips children with more skills and knowledge, thus giving them the ability to read and write fluently. This makes them eligible for employment which is a good chance for the children’s family to get lifted out of poverty.

Education Can Reduce Inequality

Most individuals, that live in poverty are not given equal opportunities as the rest in the society. This means that they lack power and they are not equally represented. However, with quality education increasing access to employment opportunities, wages disparity is reduced and also injustices due to unequal representation hence reducing poverty.

Skills and Abilities Development

Education equips one with soft skills that are necessary when one relates with others and the world around them. Education strengthens and equips one with communication skills, time management skills, creativity, leadership skills among others. When one puts these skills into use, they can generate income hence reducing poverty.

Conclusion

To sum it up, education has been named the fourth Sustainable Development Goal by the United Nations as it contributes highly to poverty eradication. Importantly, children should be exposed to equitable and quality education to attain the best skills and knowledge that they can use to generate income and access employment to improve their well-being and that of their families.

Tips for Overcoming Anxiety as a College Student

Tips for Overcoming Anxiety as a College Student

College can be a stressful season of life, whether you’re living on campus far from home or commuting from living with your family. More demanding academics, changing social circles, and preparing for a future career can contribute to a student’s stress levels. In addition to dealing with everyday stress levels, some students experience more debilitating anxiety. Whether it’s test anxiety surrounding academics, social anxiety preventing the formation of good relationships, or even just general anxiety about everyday troubles can drastically affect a student’s ability to thrive in college. However, there are great resources to support students struggling with anxiety! Keep reading below for tips on overcoming anxiety in college.

  • Avoid Isolation

It can be tempting to hole up in your room and avoid stressful situations when feeling anxious. However, isolating yourself is rarely helpful. Loneliness can exacerbate anxiety, so prioritize social time in your schedule. If you’re struggling to make friends, consider joining a club or organization on campus that aligns with your interests!

  • Take Care of Your Body

Especially if you deal with anxiety surrounding academics or other responsibilities, you might find yourself slacking on self-care. Pulling all-nighters to study or skipping meals to keep writing a paper might get your work done, but it will also take a toll on your body and your mental health. Prioritize getting enough sleep every night and eating regular meals. Your body needs fuel and energy to perform well academically, so take care of it!

  • Take Advantage of Campus Resources

Do you feel like you can’t keep up with your schedule or can’t manage your anxiety on your own? Chances are, your campus has resources available to you. Academic advisors can help you balance your schedule and connect you with tutors or study groups, and many campuses even offer free mental health counseling for students. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help; these professionals are there to help students thrive in their studies.